Recent developments in eMobility (electro mobility or advanced mobility) have led to increasing options for clean and efficient vehicles that rely on electric powertrain technologies, in-vehicle information, communication technologies, and connected infrastructures.  The systems within these vehicles pose unique sealing and vibration management challenges vs cars with traditional combustion engines.

Rogers’ advanced materials are used in a wide variety of eMobility platforms, including gaskets and vibration management foams for airbag sensors, sound systems, and batteries. Let’s take a closer look at the challenges of vibration management and gasketing / sealing in EVs and hybrid vehicles.

Learn how Rogers advanced materials are used in a wide variety of eMobility platforms.

High performance gaskets are found in Exterior Lighting Seals; On-board EV Charging Seals; Roof Mounted Antenna Seals; Sensors; Back Up Camera Seals; Drive Train PCB Isolation Pads; EV & HEV Battery Isolation/Battery Separator & Compression Pads; Heat Shields; Buzz, Squeak and Rattle Isolation (BSR) Pads; Noise, Vibration & Harshness Isolation Pads; and Tolerance and Gap Pads.

Vibration management foams are found in Dampers/Isolators for Shock, Vibration, Noise & Impact; Gas Tank Isolator Pads; Airbag Sensor Arm Rest Pads; Door Handle Isolation Pads; Infotainment Display Seals; Isolation Pad Interior Trim for Cup Holders and Bin Liners; and Sunroof Control Panels.

High Performance Materials

Rogers’ Elastomeric Material Solutions group provides a wide range of high performance materials, from soft foams for automotive fuel tank isolator pads and camera window gaskets to very firm foams for enclosure gaskets. The company’s foams – PORON® polyurethane material and BISCO® silicone materials – provide solutions for door panels, air bags, instrument panels, battery systems, and more.

Vibration Management

Automotive interiors and exteriors are subjected to a variety of extreme environmental conditions. Safety is also a concern as severe damage – electrical shock or explosion – is possible if the vehicle’s battery pack is not properly sealed. Batteries need to be packaged to absorb internal impact energy. Vibration must be managed both within the pack and between the pack and the surrounding vehicle.

  • BISCO® Silicone Compression Set Resistance (C-set) withstands collapse due to the stresses of compression and temperature over time. This extends the life of the vehicle part by continuing to seal and absorb shock.
  • In EV / HEV batteries, cushions/springs hold components firmly in place and, if needed, firmly in contact with each other. PORON® polyurethane materials have a unique ability to produce a very consistent level of force across a range of compressions. This allows the system designer to predict the material’s behavior across varied dimensional tolerances.

Gasketing, Sealing, and Gap Filling

Like most vehicles, EVs and HEVs need to withstand the elements and function in all environments. Gaskets and gap fillers protect sensitive electronics – often in the presence of extreme temperatures – and seal out air, water, dust, light, and electromagnetic interference (EMI).

  • Gaskets made from BISCO® silicone materials seal the interface, such as where a battery is plugged into the electrical grid, and provide exceptional UV resistance and cold temperature flexibility.
  • PORON® polyurethane materials are low-outgassing and non-fogging. They contain no plasticizers or residual chemicals to contaminate devices. Wherever it is used, the material will not become brittle and crumble, and is non-corrosive to metal.

Vibration management should always be considered in any engineering design. Applications that have effectively incorporated vibration management surround us every day, from buildings to rail cars. Even the mirrors on our cars have to pass a vibration test to ensure visual clarity at high speeds. Designs that neglect to properly address vibration often result in malfunctioning components and, in some cases, catastrophic failure.

Vibration_White_Paper3But vibration management can be confusing. So we’re making it a bit easier for you with three solid and easy to follow white paper so vibration management can really will be as easy as one, two, three.

White Paper: Understanding Vibration Isolation Efficiency Curves

While Load vs. Natural Frequency Curves are helpful in understand vibration management, Vibration Isolation Efficiency (VIE) Curves take the design one step further. When designing for isolation, engineers tend to look for materials with a low natural frequency and VIE Curves compare materials to identify which product has a larger region of isolation.

“To use this curve effectively, it must be used in conjunction with the Load vs. Natural Frequency curve for the same material. These two curves are frequently represented together. Designers identify the natural frequency of the product based on the loading being applied to the material. This is accomplished by consulting the load versus natural frequency curve. Once loading is identified, the natural frequency is located on the X-axis of the vibration isolation efficiency curve and compared with various forcing frequencies of concern on the Y-axis. The curves in Figure 5 and Figure 6.0 demonstrate how this might be achieved.”

We’ve spent a lot of time researching, studying, and sorting data in order to provide you with the best information available. This white paper will provide you with a solid understanding of an important aspect of vibration management: Understanding Vibration Isolation Efficiency Curves.

Vibration management needs to be considered in any engineering design. Applications that have effectively incorporated vibration management surround us every day, from buildings to rail cars. Even the mirrors on our cars have to pass a vibration test to ensure visual clarity at high speeds. Designs that neglect to properly address vibration often result in malfunctioning components and, in some cases, catastrophic failure.

But vibration management can be confusing. So we’re making it a bit easier for you with three solid and easy to follow white paper. So not vibration management really will be as easy as one, two, three.

White Paper: Understanding Load Versus Natural Frequency Curves

Become familiar with load versus natural frequency data and explore the factors that can impact a material’s natural frequency. From increased thickness to increased mass, this white paper will bring you up to speed with everything you need to not only interpret this valuable data, but also to understand how it can change and what those changes mean.

[The Load Versus Natural Frequency Curve] illustrates how the natural frequency of a material changes based on material thickness and the load applied. Load vs. Natural Frequency aids engineers in determining what the material’s natural frequency will be in the end application. Using a Single Degree of Freedom (SDOF) system, we can define natural frequency as a function of mass and stiffness.

We’ve spent a lot of time researching, studying, and sorting data in order to provide you with the best information available. This white paper will provide you with a solid understanding of an important aspect of vibration management and, in the coming weeks, we’ll discuss the final of our three white papers: Understanding Vibration Isolation Efficiency Curves.

Vibration management needs to be considered in any engineering design. Applications that have effectively incorporated vibration management surround us every day, from buildings to rail cars. Even the mirrors on our cars have to pass a vibration test to ensure visual clarity at high speeds. Designs that neglect to properly address vibration often result in malfunctioning components and, in some cases, catastrophic failure.

But vibration management can be confusing. So we’re making it a bit easier for you with three solid and easy to follow white papers. Now vibration management really will be as easy as one, two, three.

White Paper: Vibration Isolation and Damping, the Basics

Familiarize yourself with some of the necessary vocabulary in the world of vibration. From transmissibility to natural frequency, this white paper will bring you up to speed on everything you need to know to get started.

Natural frequency, also known as resonant frequency, is the specific frequency at which a material will naturally vibrate. If unaffected by outside forces, a material vibrating at natural frequency will vibrate forever; this is Newton’s first law of motion…When systems or structures are forced to vibrate at natural frequencies, the oscillations develop very large amplitudes of deflection. This results in excessive shaking, component wear, and, ultimately, failure of the structure or component.

We’ve spent a lot of time researching, studying, and sorting data in order to provide you with the best information available. This white paper will provide you with a solid foundation and, in the coming weeks, we’ll discuss two additional white papers that will help strengthen that foundation.

Helping Design Engineers Understand Vibration Management

Vibration management is a critical component of many successful designs. Understanding both damping and isolation in terms of vibration control has allowed technology to radically change our lives. Applications that have effectively incorporated vibration management surround us every day, from buildings to rail cars. Even the mirrors on our cars have to pass a vibration test to ensure visual clarity at high speeds. But regardless of important, understanding vibration management is sometimes easier said than done.

However, we can help make solving this problem a bit less daunting than it may seem.

Introducing a Web Site Dedicated to Understanding Vibration Management

We have recently launched an information center dedicated to understanding vibration management and what that means for your design.

Maybe you’re new to the world of vibration management and need to understand the difference between damping and isolating. Or perhaps you understand the difference between the two, but you’re struggling to interpret the data. Or maybe you’re in the final phases of your design and you know you need a damper, but you’re just not sure which damper to design in.

Wherever you are in the process of bringing vibration management into your design, this website can help.

So what does the website really offer?

Right now:

  • White papers that cover the vibration spectrum
  • Web links that address many issues in the world of vibration management
  • Contact information so that you can get in touch with one of our specialists

In the near future? We’ll be adding:

  • A catalog of our products with full vibrations data
  • An interactive tool that will help you design in the right materials

So read up! Become a vibrations expert!

And when the tool launches, you’ll know everything you need to know to help you make the best choice.

Of course, if you’re still not completely confident, we’re always here to help.

Send an email to Noah Bouschard (noah.bouschard at rogerscorp.com).